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Tara Mandala Blog
Jul 05

Compassion Series: Part 1 – Connecting to the Source

Introducing a four-part series on Compassion

How can we meet the needs of the world and each other? With compassion we embrace the needs that are present at any given moment. The expression of compassion is contemplative, active, and fundamental to our being. Welcome to our four-part series, focusing on four ways in which compassion serves us.

Part 1: Connecting to the Source of Compassion

Compassion arises out of, and dissolves back into, its source. Yet it is inseparable from the source. Why is this important? Because this reflects our potentiality for resilience, flexibility, and curiosity. We observe and hold everything and everyone in balance and union. From this view, compassion becomes who we are. Just as we are.

In many cultures throughout history, this source is known as the “Great Mother”. In Tibetan Buddhism, she is represented as the philosophy and meditation of “Prajñaparamita”, familiarizing us with the ongoing birth of our Buddha nature, which is infinitely loving. It provides us with more mental clarity, emotional stability, and healthier relationships in the world. And compassion sustains these qualities.

As a philosophy, Prajñaparamita is the “Perfection of Wisdom”. As an “open awareness” meditation, we integrate this philosophy into our being. Quite simply, we rest our minds in this meditative vast view. We grow to trust compassion, connect with it, and ultimately we embody compassion.

Tara Mandala will offer the Prajñaparamita Online Program, from July 13 to August 1, with Lopön Charlotte Rotterdam and Pieter Oosthuizen. Learn to connect with the source, resting in spaciousness, looking deeper within, and expanding further outward. Learn more »

“We are relaxing back into the ground of being, which is the source of all phenomenal existence.”

~ Pieter Oosthuizen

In this video, Pieter Oosthuizen expounds upon the meditation of Prajñaparamita – The Great Mother.
Photo: Prajñaparamita – The Great Mother
July 13 to August 1
Prajñaparamita is one of the key philosophies and practices of the Mahayana teachings of Buddhism. Understand the historical origins and profound meaning of the Prajñaparamita (Perfection of Wisdom) philosophy. Learn this primary ‘open awareness’ meditation that is regularly practiced at Tara Mandala. Suitable for both beginning and seasoned practitioners. Prajñaparamita is a core practice of the Tara Mandala Magyu Program, and a complimentary practice to Feeding Your Demons®.
REGISTER NOW

ABOUT THE RETREAT TEACHERS

Magyu Lopön Charlotte Z. Rotterdam

Magyu Lopön Charlotte Z. Rotterdam has studied Tibetan Buddhism for the last 20 years, was authorized to teach by Lama Tsultrim Allione in 2006, and received the title of Magyu Lopön, lead teacher of Magyu: The Mother Lineage at Tara Mandala from Lama Tsultrim in 2016. Lopön Charlotte teaches in the US and abroad, often in partnership with her husband Pieter Oosthuizen, and co-leads the Boulder Tara Mandala Sangha. Lopön Charlotte received a Masters in Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School where she studied comparative religion … Read more »

Pieter Oosthuizen

Pieter Oosthuizen is a teacher and entrepreneur and a long-time student of Tibetan Buddhism. He has been teaching various practices and retreats in Lama Tsultrim’s lineage in the US and abroad since 2006, offering a blend of incisive insight and genuine compassion. He co-leads the Boulder Tara Mandala Sangha with Lopön Charlotte Rotterdam, and serves as the President of the Tara Mandala Board. His years of leadership have been dedicated to creating healthy, creative, and effective organizations built on cultures of openness and authenticity … Read more »

Pieter Oosthuizen

We hope you enjoyed this first part of our Compassion Series, inspiring a deeper connection with the world. Keep an eye out for part two in the coming weeks.

~With Blessings,
Tara Mandala Retreat Center

Photos: Header and Prajñaparamita statue at Tara Mandala (Bodhi Stroupe), Bhutanese Mountains (J. Brownlee)